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ArcaniA - The Complete Tale - Review - PS4

by: Luke Horn - 05/22/15

In Arcania – The Complete Tale by Spellbound and publisher Nordic Games, tragedy, revenge and demonic forces give the game a meaningful, albeit classic storyline. It’s as if Romeo has come alive and is bent on revenge for the death of his pregnant Juliet.

The player starts off as a king gone mad who is plagued by demons and is out for world domination. A short play through and a few nominal fights later, the gamer gets to the hero of the story - a farmer who is madly in love with the hottest young woman in the village. He is trying to win the acceptance of her father by proving himself worthy with heroic deeds. While away on his adventures, the village, his love and his unborn child, are all slaughtered by a dark force. He is to be “nevermore” with his Juliet. Like all tragic lovers, he must garner his strength and set out on a journey of revenge.

Like most open world games, the player will find a common theme of quests that serve to level up the character. You can choose to simply follow the main plot lines thus moving the story along or you can accept multiple side quests. That is the beauty of open world games; you choose how much time you want to devote to the world. The thing to keep in mind is that in order to open other parts of the map you must eventually follow the main plot line, but that is pretty common in many open world games. Some people have called the game a bit too straight lined or linear. However, I disagree in the sense that all games have a main plot line that pushes them forward. That is nothing new to open world RPG games.

The graphics are sub-par but hey I am used to playing the big budget games like Dragon Age and Dying Light. I do appreciate the simple crafting methods that the game has as I am not one who likes to spend countless hours on a game trying to figure out the combinations of what works and what doesn’t work. I give them a big “Hell Yeah” for that choice of gameplay. That was one thing that always aggravated me about the Dragon Age series; I would spend painstaking hours on crafting. I am just not into the crafting aspect and appreciate the simple approach they took on this concept of the game. Like most RPG games you must work your way up to the big items by leveling up your character with the completion of both friendly and combative quests. Yes, in the beginning, it can be a big sluggish but for the most part it moves fast.

Arcania’s combat system is fun and at times what some might call pedestrian. I find its system to be refreshing in an ‘old school’ type of way. To me the combat system is one of the major draws of the game as it allows the player to fight fluidly and not have constant pauses during battle. You have to time your hits, block and know when to strike. It does provide a fun bash and slash atmosphere for the player and in some ways this aspect of the game becomes addictive. It doesn’t get lost in a multitude of controls. I enjoyed that aspect immensely as it allowed me to hone in on the fights and appreciate the combative gameplay.

As an open world game it obviously doesn’t have the big dollar budget but in some ways I respected that as it made me feel like I was an important part of the game and that the game actually needed me in it to be relevant. Its European aura was refreshing and I would recommend Arcania – The Complete Tale because one doesn’t have to dedicate a decade of their life to the game and ignore their friends and families for weeks to enjoy it. Cheers!

Rating: 7 out of 10. A review code was provided for this story.

 

 

 

 

Gaming Nexus' Jeremy Duff gives the weekly rundown of news and notable releases. This week features: Puzzles & Dragons: Super Mario Edition, Destiny: House of Wolves DLC and The Witcher 3: Wild Hunt!

Brawl Review - PS4

Brawl by Bloober Team harkens back to the traditional arcade style games with an overhead point of view that resembles a twisted version of Guntlet. In the online mode, you find yourself running around boxes and various other barriers as you blow up pathways and try to lay a detonation of destruction upon your enemies. You can play against up to three other gamers in versus mode or play one other player in duel mode. A sheep or horde setting is also available.

The horror themed introduction coupled with the strange characters that are anywhere from disabled to maniacal, makes one feel like they have been cast into the role of a gothic inbred psychopath. You have eight characters to choose from and all of them are fractured or twisted in some way and believe me, the music combined with the horrific characters is enough to make your brain bleed and send you into a seizure. You can play anything from a psychotic clown that might be straight out of IT or John Wayne Gacy himself, to a blind child who is being possessed by an evil teddy bear (and no its not Marky Mark’s party Ted). However, once played, the game becomes more of a box of madness where frustration quickly sets in and overtakes your mind. The AI in the game is difficult and repetitive at the same time. I often found the enemies going in the same straight back and forth line and getting caught in front of boxes. It is quite easy to find yourself disinterested due to the low end budget of the game and its quirky controls. But let’s not be too picky, it’s a 20 dollar game that is best played with a beer in hand.

The game clearly focuses its main concept around the at-home multi-player mode. I like to blow up my friends and Brawl lets me do that. It is a party game but finding players online was difficult so when I say “party”, I mean it in its truest form. If you don’t invite people over to play a local multi-player game, you might not find anyone to play. The goal of the game is to trick or force your enemies into the bombs you have strategically laid around the maze in an attempt to send them to an explosive death. You must outsmart or trap your adversaries using the special skills that your chosen character has or by gobbling up the dropped enhancements – such as lightning and other bombs. As the time and rounds move forward, you will have more “goodies” with which to dominate.

The only benefit to the story mode that I could see was that you were able to figure out which character is best suited for your style of play. Overall it is a lower-end version of Bomberman and clearly not as fun. It is a hard game for me to recommend but if you are into party games, it definitely has a beer appeal. 6.5 rating. A review code was provided for this review

 

Wes Murphy reviews PC game DLC expansion Age of Wonders III: Eternal Lords! a review code was provided for this report.

 

Tower of Guns Review - PS4
by: Luke Horn -
04/23/15 

Tower of Guns by Terrible Posture Games is a quirky first-shooter game with turns and twists that makes one feel as if they have entered the mind of Erno Rubik himself. With each turn of the cube, or in this case the “tower”, one finds the internal architecture of the game randomly changes. This creates an ever shifting design for the player to traverse through. The random nature of the design feeds into the impromptu characters that you are presented with. You could end up being anything from a pizza delivery guy to a FBI agent in the form of a dog. The storylines provide a comedic feel to the gamer, if you decide to pay attention to it.

The simple gameplay makes me feel like I have a mouse in my hand instead of a controller. It is refreshing to not be overwhelmed with button mashing complexity. However, don’t let the simple design of the game fool you, it still is easy to die. It takes adroit hands and fast shooting to survive in the open spaces that the game forces you to fight in. The faster you move the better! The vile robots and bosses toss bullets, lasers, and even saws at you in an attempt to send you to your grave.

You start the game with anything from a Portable Pizza Thrower to a Peas-n Carrots pistol. As you kill your enemies they will drop various experience and currency orbs that will help you unlock hidden items and more powerful weapons such as the Absurditron 9000 or the XP Launcher. The more you play the game and the more you accomplish, the better the guns and perks you earn. Its unlock system reminds one of a mini Call of Duty setting. For example, in order to attain The Hedgehog one must kill 250 spikeball launchers. The games humoristic style continues with its perk system. As you advance in gameplay you will earn perks such as the Taco Terror and the Grease Pit.

As you are bouncing around trying to destroy your enemies, remember to look around. Concealed in the nooks and crannies of the rooms are secrets that one can find. The hidden power-ups, massive health badges and secret rooms, could be the difference between your success or demise. Without this aspect of the game you could easily be pulled into a mindless jumping and shooting that would take the title into a realm of irrelevance.

Like most FPS games the goal is to finish the levels and beat the boss. There are 5 levels with anywhere from 5 to 6 bosses to conquer. It typically takes anywhere from 50 to 90 minutes to play through. The cheap cost and low time investment play makes Tower of Guns an easy purchase. I am not a fan of low investment games but for those of you who are, this is a recommended buy.  I give it 7.5 out of 10. A review code was provided for this report.

 

 

 

Xavier S H reviews Xbox One version of Tales from the Borderlands Episode Two: Atlas Mugged. A Review code was provided for this report.

 

 

Game of Thrones: Episode 3 "Sword in the Darkness" Review - Xbox One
By: Alan M. Wasserman - 03/26/15

“Words are wind. Choices define who you are.” These words as spoken to Asher Forrester by his estranged uncle about halfway through Telltale Game’s latest installment of their Game of Thrones series. The quote sums up just about every game in Telltale’s library of games but resonates even more true in the GoT series. The game picks up right after Episode 2 leaves off as Asher, Beshka, and Malcolm are traversing the dessert outside of Meereen as they continue their flight from the Lost Legion. They find themselves cornered in a cave with nowhere to run as the Lost Legion finally catches up with them. The duck into a cave to hide and what they find in the cave is more dangerous and amazing than the Lost Legion and quickly you must choose between your friend, Beshka, and your family, Malcolm, as they engage in battle and both appear to be on the verge of being defeated. I try not to spoil plot points in these reviews, but let’s just say what you find in the cave is something Daenerys Targaryen has lost.

The game continues the story of the royally screwed House Forrester and their plight against the forces that move against them. Rodrik and his family must deal with Gryff Whitehill and his men moving into Ironrath and disrespecting everyone in the family including mimicking the death Ethan from Chapter One. Rodrick and his council must decide to move against House Whitehill or rescue the youngest Forrester, Ryon, from Highpoint, seat of the House Whitehill. The choices you make could save or destroy the family.

Mira Forrester continues on as the handmaiden of Margaery Tyrell, though her actions seem to constantly disappoint the Queen to be. You find out from your friend Sera, also one of the Handmaidens of Lady Margaery, that Margaery is looking to replace you and because you did not stand up for Sera previously she did not come to your defense. Will the Queen send you packing? Only the choices you make will decide your fate. More importantly, Mira’s relationship with Tyrion Lannister and the deal they struck for Ironwood may destroy the Forrester family after the death of Joffrey at the royal wedding.

And then there is Gared Tuttle, the squire sent to the wall for killing a Bannerman of Roose Bolton. He has become a full fledged member of the Night’s Watch. One of the best parts of this chapter is the trip to the Weirwood Tree north of the wall, the same place Jon Snow took his vows in the books and on the TV show. There you say the vows of the Night’s Watch along with your other brothers, just as Jon Snow did before you. After it’s over Jon welcomes you to the order and to Rangers. Just as you are returning from the Weirwood, your Uncle who sent you to The Wall to begin with, shows up with a quest for you. You must desert your new Brothers in the Night’s Watch and search for the North Grove, a “forest in a forest” as it’s the key to save House Forrester. What choice will you make? Honor your vows or desert and go North of the Wall in search of riddle.

No game that I play has me sitting on pins and needles with every decision I make. Did I just doom someone else to die? Will this choice screw me over 3 chapters from now? Just like life, the choices we make define who we are. It’s one of the things Telltale continues to refine more and more as they evolve in their version of storytelling. Their other games like The Walking Dead or The Wolf Among Us had choices to make, but I never felt anxiety at making them. The worst part is most of the choices in this chapter of Game of Thrones had that dreaded countdown, so you couldn’t agonize over it or think about what you were going do. There was some really good combat in this chapter as well as you had more choices over what to pick up, where to hit, and whether or not to deliver a killing blow. They clearly are taking some cues from the Borderlands series there. I say this after every chapter, but this was my favorite installment so far. Spending more time in Meereen and on the Wall was nice change from Ironrath and King’s Landing where a good portion of the other chapters took place. And finally at the end you get introduced to none other than Khaleesi Daenerys Targaryen as Asher tells her where to find what it was she lost. She warns Asher to “choose his words carefully.” I would warn Asher to choose his actions even more carefully. Of course if he chooses poorly, I have only myself to blame. 10 out of 10! A review code was provided for this report.

Until the next chapter....Valar Morghulis!

 

 

Wes Murphy reviews PC version of Over 9,000 Zombies! A review code was provided for this report.

Xavier S H reviews Xbox One version of The Escapists. A review code was provided for this report.

Xavier S H reviews PC game Idol Hands. A review code was provided for this report.

Game of Thrones: Episode 2 "The Lost Lords" Review - Xbox One

By: Alan M. Wasserman

Ahhh…Westeros, a land rife with politicking, neck stabbing, thieving and scheming, and plotting why do I love thee so? In this second chapter of Telltale Games’ Game of Thrones: Iron from Ice “The Lost Lords” brings you back to the broken House Forrester and continues their struggle against the Whitehall’s, Bolton’s and Lannister’s. The game starts with a recap of the decisions you made in the last chapter so you can cringe and swear to yourself all over again when you see the results of your poor choices. As the credits roll you are pulled to Yunkai following the liberation of the city by Daenerys Targaryen to find Asher Forrester, the exiled son of House Forrester who was largely absent from the first chapter, attempting to collect a bounty on a slaver in one of the city’s taverns. Things, per usual in Westeros, take a turn for the worse when Asher and his mercenary companion Beskha are assaulted by the Lost Legion. The game then launches into a chaotic fight scene that brings evolved mechanics from the first game. The fights require timed thumb stick swipes to dodge attacks, quick time events to attack or avoid attacks, and the Telltale Games’ standard mechanic of moving the target over the highlighted portion of enemies’ bodies and pushing the right button. I was surprised at the speed of the battle, and the timer moves much quicker. I got Asher run through with swords several times before I got it right. Sorry Bro.

The game is high on narrative and again bounces around to the children of House Forrester. You visit Mira again at King’s Landing where she continues to serve Margaery Tyrell and is divided between her loyalty to her family and the family she serves, you take part in Gared Tuttle’s first days on The Wall as a Night’s Watch initiate, and in a small plot twist you find out, once thought dead, that Rodrick Forrester survived his ordeal at The Twins and is brought back to Ironrath and though crippled takes his place as Lord.

The narrative unfolds as Rodrick tries to rekindle the love of his betrothed Lady Elaena Glenmore whose father commands an army that the Forresters can use to secure their holdings, if only she would still want to marry. Gared gets a short and curt lesson from Westeros’ favorite bastard Jon Snow, who I feel needed a lot more screen time, as they prepare for Mance Raynar’s attack on the wall from The North.

The episode ends at the funeral of the Lord Gregor, killed at The Twins, as Talia Forrester sings a song while the funeral pyre burns; while cut scenes of the estranged family members are interjected over the assembly standing vigil. Before the credits role the camera focuses on Rodrick where an intense look of pain, anger, and focus plays across this scarred face. End episode and you get the recap on how your decisions stacked up against the rest of the community who have played the game and then instantly regret some of those decisions.

I am an unabashed Game of Thrones fan and this game continues that love affair. The decisions you are required to make are tough and painful and makes the decisions you make in games by Bioware or Bethesda seem easy. The best answer is often the most difficult choice as you start to care about these characters and that choice often will not make them happy or even safe. The cameos of the TV shows’ main cast continues to tie this story into the carefully crafted world that HBO and George R.R .Martin have created.

Gameplay wise I only had a few small issues with this chapter. In several of the scenes the backdrops or settings appeared grainy and wavy in appearance. The image would settle and stabilize after a few seconds in frame, but it was still noticeable. There were also some lags in the more action packed scenes where the frame would freeze for second before catching up. In a game that is narrative and choice driven these are not huge deals. Where I did have a larger issue, and it’s more of an annoyance really, is several times dialogue was repeated twice in a row. It would usually occur when a character interjected his/her thoughts into a scene. That line of dialogue would repeat its self and the scene would continue. This chapter seemed shorter than the first one, but still extremely enjoyable. I give it 9.5 out of 10 stars. To all who play this game I say Valar Morghulis!

 

Dying Light Review - PS4

by: Luke Horn - 02/05/15

Developer: Techland

Publisher: Warner Bros. Interactive Entertainment

Genre: Action Zombie Survival Game

Platforms: PS4, Xbox One, and PC

There is a moment in-between the dying light of day and the approach of night that reveals the fear in the soul of man. Dying Light’s intriguing contrast of the day and night cycle brings about this idea. During the day you jump from balconies and rooftops trying to avoid the hordes of zombies while you scavenge and complete missions. You think to yourself, “this isn’t so scary”. However, when the light of day sets and you enter the night cycle super zombies known as Volatiles emerge. They immediately begin howling and instantly you know they carry your death. You have two options – run for safety or hide. Fear sets in.

 Dying Light starts with an adrenaline filled first-scene and quickly becomes a slow burn. The opening scene has Kyle Crane, a secret government operative, jumping from a plane into the city of Harran – a fictional city set in ancient Turkey. His mission is to infiltrate the Tower and find a secret file which contains critical data about the zombie virus. He is immediately bitten and then saved by Jade Aldemir –the sexy heroine. She takes him to the tower where the prologue starts. The beginning of the game has moments of boredom as you begin to understand the mechanics which heavily revolve around parkour. I urge you to push through! As you pass the prologue and begin to bite into the game, you quickly realize the intrigue it possesses.

The weapons system is one of the most likeable and friendly parts of the game. As you collect weapons, you are introduced to an easy system of modifications and upgrades. As a gamer I found it refreshing that I didn’t get slowed down by a weapons creation system that you have to spend hours on. The cooperative mode was fluid and entertaining. Who doesn’t like bashing in zombie brains with their friends? It made me feel like I was starring in Shaun of the Dead with my besties. And the “Be the Zombie” mode was exhilarating as you can invade another gamer’s world as a Night Hunter zombie and try to kill them.

There are a few issues with the game. The mechanics of the parkour system are at times frustrating, the map can be confusing, the climbing of ridiculously tall obstacles can create gamer stress and the distance you have to cover can be annoying as there are no instant travel points.

So the question is to buy Dying Light or not to buy Dying Light? Yes it harkens to Dead Island and has smatterings of gameplay that remind you of Far Cry and Fallout. It has shortcomings and lacks deep characters. But shouldn’t gaming also be about entertaining gameplay and connecting with your friends? For me it is a must buy. I give it an 8.0. A review code for PS4 was provided for this report.

 

Xavier S H reviews the Razer Kraken gaming headset for Xbox One! Review product was provided for this report.

Game of Thrones: Episode One "Iron from Ice" Review - Xbox One

by: Alan M. Wasserman - 12/11/14

Ever want to be on the receiving end of the ice cold gaze of Queen Regent Cersei Lannister? How about going toe to toe with bastard born psychopath Ramsey Snow? How about trading quips with the cerebral and troublemaking Tyrion Lannister? Telltale Games latest installment into narrative driven games allows you to do just that.

Iron from Ice starts during the now infamous Red Wedding. During the festivities House Forrester is attacked by the double crossing (that’s a pun for the ages for Game of Thrones fans) Freys at the Twins, where most of the participants at the party are holistically slaughtered while drunk and unaware. You start the game as Gared Tuttle a squire to Lord Ironwood who fights as a Bannerman to the King in the North Rob Stark. True to a chapter in J. R. R. Martin’s books or an episode of HBO show; things go from good to bad to horrible in the matter of a few minutes. You are immediately thrust into action where the first choice you have to make is to warn Lord Forrester of the impending attack or help his first born son and heir to safety.

The game presses on just like the books or show by integrating several key characters into the narrative. After starting as Gared, you play as Lord Forrester’s third son and fourth child Ethan who at a tender young age is now the ruler of the Forrester family. The game then shifts to his older sister Mira who is working as handmaiden to Margaery Tyrell in Kings Landing. The first episode of the game alternates the narrative of these three characters and the events surrounding House Forrester after the Red Wedding.

Like all Telltale Games the choices you make determines the story you experience. Choose to defy Cersei and you can find yourself in serious trouble with House Lannister. Stand up to Ramsey Snow and end up a flayed man next to a campfire in the middle of the Iron Wood. The game distills down the agonizing options into two or three equally valid choices. Sometimes they are timed and your answer or lack of answer can influence how other characters respond to you. Other choices are given to you with no time limit. Making the choice that much harder.

The voice acting, character facial capture, and feel of the game make it feel like you are in control of an episode of the show. It’s amazing that Telltale was able to get the actual actors and actresses that play these deep, easily recognizable characters into the game. Telltale’s The Walking Dead game had shout outs to the TV cast; Game of Thrones has the actual characters in the game!! The jibs and jabs between Cersei and Tyrion feel a little stiff and not as natural as they do on TV, but the experience of being in front of the Iron Throne listening to them go back and forth is almost mind blowing.

The graphics and animation are slightly better than the last gen titles The Walking Dead and The Wolf Among Us. But TellTale Games focus on the story and the choices you make and how they impact your story over the course of multiple episodes and I hope seasons, and I can tell you these choices, as small as they seem at the outset, are going to make for huge plot swings in the later chapters. The animation and art almost takes a back seat.

I cannot wait until the next chapter comes out! This game gets 10 out 10 and I may play it again to see if I change the choices I make how different the game feels at the end. Excellent narrative, good mix of some action sequence and Peter Freaking Dinklage!!! Valar Morghulis! A review code was provided for this story.

Xavier S H reviews Xbox One version of Tales from the Borderlands: Episode One "Zer0 Sum". A review code was provided for this report.

Shadow of Mordor Review - Xbox One
by: Alan Wasserman - 10/20/14

Shadow of Mordor was nominated and won a ton of awards at E3 this year. After playing it for 12+ hours I can tell you that every one of those accolades is deserved. The game was created by Warner Bros.; the same house that brought the Batman Arkham games to life, from the get go you can feel the influence of those games in Mordor’s free flow combat system. The ability to chain attacks together with finishers and takedowns should feel very familiar to veterans of the Batman game. The leveling system is pretty robust; you can level up your character and each of the weapons he uses. While the amount of weapons you can use is limited to a long sword, a bow, and a broken sword .Talion uses as a dagger for executions and silent takedowns, the range of what you can do with them is pretty impressive.

The hero of the story, Talion, is a half wraith/half human anti-hero. After watching his family gets ritually slaughtered at the hands of an Agent of Mordor, Talion is “reborn” as death has rejected him. During this process he is linked to a wraith who shares a similar path and story to his own. Together they launch their plan for revenge so they both can rest at peace and join their families in the afterlife. The interactions between Talion and the wraith are pretty entertaining. The wraith is a central historic figure in the Tolkien universe and plays sort of the moral center of the story, while Talion plays the brute who likes to use force of will and arms to get his way. The creators of the game have taken pieces and parts from Tolkien’s less popular works (like Unfinished Tales, the Silmarillion, etc) and included them in the game to make it accurate and deep without messing with the core story from Lord of the Rings or the Hobbit.

The unique thing about the game is the Nemesis system. Each area of Mordor (there are 2 in the game) has five War Chief Uruks who are super powerful. Each War Chief has 1-2 body guards made up of the lower level Uruk and Orc captains.  There are fifteen Orc Captains. When you start out you don’t know who any of the captains or war chiefs are. You have to interrogate lower level orcs or find Intel to uncover who they are and what their strengths and weaknesses are, what or who they are afraid of or what enrages them. The captains hang out in areas called strongholds and sometimes while you are on your way to a mission point or to get a collectible you stumble upon 1 or 2 (I’ve had as many as 3) captains in one area and a huge fight ensues. I literally have been so swarmed by orcs and Uruks that the whole screen is full of them and button mashing ensues to get Talion jumping back and forth chaining together attack to clear out the fodder to take down the Captain.

When you kill a captain you are granted a rune that you can attach to one of your three weapons that enhances it in certain ways. It can increase the amount of damage you do while mounted, or give you chance to regain life on an execution etc. The strength of the rune depends on how he was defeated. Taking advantages of his weaknesses and fears will grant you a higher level rune. Captains are not immediately replaced, but once you are defeated the Nemesis system then goes into action. The Uruk that killed you gets promoted to Captain, then about ½ of the open captain slots are filled by other unknown Uruks or those captains who were present at your defeat are majorly promoted to elite captains.

The purpose of the Nemesis system is that my game should be slightly different than anyone else’s. The Orcs that defeat me in combat will not be the same as the ones that get you.  As mentioned each of the captains have a specific weakness, one that I love to exploit is that some of them can be killed with a single headshot. The bow in the game fires pretty far and its awesome and hilarious to shoot a captain from 200ft or more away, follow the arrow as it kills them and the watching all the orcs in the area run away like cockroaches with the light turned on.

For completionists the game has a ton of collectibles and things do to do outside of the main story line. You can roam the lands of Mordor and find hidden artifacts that provide backstory to the world and the characters you encounter throughout the game. Furthermore there are elven inscriptions called Ithildin, collecting each one completes a doorway similar to the one seen in Lord of Rings that leads to Moria. Each area, flora, fauna, and person you discover unlocks more lore about the world of Lord of the Rings giving it a robust and deep backstory that you can explore at your leisure.

The games achievements are pretty straightforward. Some are related to story missions, others to collecting items or completing side quests. They pop with fair regularity so you’re each session you feel like you are moving toward full completion.

I rate games based on how much I enjoy them and how challenging they are. But I also take into account how eager I am to dive back into the game after I have been away. This game has me completely engrossed and each time I turn off the counsel to go to bed I think about when I’ll get to turn it back on again.

I give this game 9.5 out of 10.

 

 

Xavier S H reviews Xbox 360 version of Cry Wolf - Episode 5 in The Wolf Among Us series. A review code was provided for this report.

 

 

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